Patrick Donohoe

Change Your Life: First, Change Your Rules With Tim Reynolds, M.D.

TWS 22 | Change Your Life

 

Life is fragile, and you only have one chance. It’s about time that you change your life and take some risks. Always ask yourself, what’s the worst thing that can happen? Tim Reynolds asked himself that same question, and he is now the founder of Living Every Minute. Learn Tim’s story on how he started his business and how he accepts some of his shortcomings. Learn how to change the rules of the game as Tim joins your host Patrick Donohoe. Also, learn more about his book, Living Every Minute, today.

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Change Your Life: First, Change Your Rules With Tim Reynolds, M.D.

The following five episodes are with businessman, investor, doctor and now, author, Tim Reynolds. The interview was in-person in my office. If you’re reading the episodes, go head over to TheWealthStandard.com and it’ll have a link there. Make sure you check that out. A little bit about Tim. Tim is a former Green Beret in the Special Forces. He was a medic and also a Battalion Surgeon. He graduated from Texas A&M with his Medical degree and his specialization was Emergency Medicine. He was an emergency room doctor for several years and then also co-started a company called HealthCARE Express. He has, I believe, 15 or 16 locations throughout Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana. He has his book. You can check it out on Amazon. It’s called Living Every Minute. It’s also on Audible. He reads the audible audiobook. Tim is an amazing guy. He’s one of the first original Platinum partners with Tony Robbins. He has a love and zest for life. It’s throughout his book.

It’s going to be throughout this interview. You can imagine that in the roles that he’s played, he has experienced firsthand the fragility of life. He’s going to share some of those experiences throughout these five segments. I want to forewarn you, this is a PG-13-ish interview. There’s some colorful language and some relatively graphic stories that Tim tells. You are going to experience him, his heart, his passion for life. You can check his website out. It’s LivingEveryMinute.com. He has some personal development programs, courses and a lot of other resources that you will want to check out. Go head over there. Without further delay, let’s start episode one with my dear friend, Tim Reynolds.

Whether it’s this experience writing a book or where people are held back by fear, first, what are maybe some stories of you confronting your fears and overcoming them? Are there some principles that you’ve found where people can follow and get through their fear?

I had an emergency medicine contract, I contracted with the hospital to run their emergency department. My business was I hired the doctors, paid the malpractice, build the patients, did all that stuff for the hospital. The doctors work in the ER. They don’t usually work for the hospital. They do in some cases but in many cases, the hospital outsources that to an ER company and the doctors. I owned that company. When I had the experience, I’ve been there for ten years. We’ve been doing this for many years. I get called in the office and they say, “We’re putting your contract out for bids.” I had been in the office maybe three months before. I said, “I’m about to put roots down about to buy a ranch.”

“I want to make sure we’re good.” “We’re good.” Ninety days later, he calls me in the offices and says they are putting the contract out for bids, which they had not done in ten years. I knew what that meant. “What did we do wrong?” “Nothing. You guys are great. We want to see if we can get it cheaper.” “I know you can get it cheaper but you aren’t getting the quality of now.” There’s that whole conversation.

We had been thinking about building the business we have now, HealthCARE Express. I walked out of that office and it felt like somebody hit me in the stomach with a baseball bat, partly because financial, partly because it became who I was. I was the Medical Director for a Level II Trauma Center. That was part of my personality. I had mixed up my career with who I was as a human.

When you start a business with no money, the fear of losing the money gets taken away from you. Click To Tweet

I was scared to death. I didn’t know what we were going to do. I didn’t know how I was going to feed my family. That was the first time that ever happened. I had two choices, go get another job because I could do that I was a Medical Director for ten years or go out on her own and try and do this ourselves. That was a big step. You’re leaving a multi-six-figure career to zero and it was zero for a good year. That was a big fear.

You have the fear where you’re losing this contract and then you decide to go completely the other direction. You took a set of fears and then you pile it on top of the other.

It was weird, too. It was like life happens for you because I don’t know if I would have had the guts to do it, had that not happened. It had been crossing my mind but the thing that had kept me there was the money. It was too good to walk away from. When there was no money, for some reason, the fear of losing the money got taken from me so I didn’t have that fear anymore. Money was already gone now. It wasn’t that I couldn’t go get it again but I was at the crossroads and I thought, “What if we go build our own thing?” Finally, the fear was, I thought, “What’s the worst thing that could happen?”

The worst thing that could happen is a question that people need to ask themselves. The worst thing that can happen is where we’re at now. Why don’t we go try and build this thing, work our asses off for a few years? If it doesn’t work out, we’re just right here. I’ll often do that and say, number one, “What’s the worst thing that could happen? Is it worth that risk?” Number two, “What’s the best thing that could happen? Is it worth that time and effort?”

If you’re going to build a business and the best thing that can happen is you’re going to make $5,000 a month, it’s probably not worth the effort. It’s not a huge risk but for me, there needs to also be a reward because I’m going to spend my time, money and brain damage trying to make it successful. One of the things that help me is to say, “Honestly, what’s the worst thing that could happen?” I bet I’ll go back finally to my old Special Forces days, we used to have a saying, “If this doesn’t kill us, it’s going to make a great story.” We’ve been in some shit where you’re like, “This might be the last day but if it doesn’t kill us, what a great story this is going to be.”

TWS 22 | Change Your Life

Change Your Life: Always ask yourself a couple of questions before starting a new venture. What’s the worst that could happen? What’s the best that could happen? And, is it worth it?

 

That adds sometimes to where you’re able to understand, worst-case scenario. You found that when a person is afraid of something, they have difficulty confronting that and asking that simple question like, “I’m afraid. What’s the worst that can happen? This could happen then this is going to happen and it’s going to happen.” “Why is that? Why are you afraid of that?” “I’m afraid because of this.” It’s not a very difficult exercise but a lot of people don’t tend to go there.

If you can help them and say to them, “Literally, what’s the worst possible case scenario that could come from this and this? Could you accept that? Could you live through that? What would you do if that happened?” “I would do ABC.” That’s the worst thing that could happen. What are you afraid of? Jump. People don’t do that analysis themselves. Another thing that happens that I help people with a lot is we don’t think logically at 2:00 in the morning but people get in their fears at 2:00 in the morning because you wake up and your brain goes circle, think about a million things.

Turn on the light, get your journal and write all those millions of things down. Those millions of things are four things, you just can’t stop circling. If you’ll take and write those down, you’ll get to a page and go, “That’s what was keeping me awake.” You can shut the journal. You’re like, “I didn’t read that somewhere. That’s what I had to do,” because we all get in that circle. The brain goes running around.

How has your hunger evolved? I assume hunger comes from what we talked about. You obviously have fears, you’re going to unpack fears but then when you understand, “What’s a level ten success look like, getting excited and inspired by that? Does hunger come from more than that? Is that where the source is?

For me, hunger comes from having this desire. I don’t know if I was born with this if I can teach this to other people but some people have more of it than others. You can certainly learn more. We listened to a lot of the same stuff, mentors and you can learn some tools and skills along the way but what made you listen to those in the beginning? What made you start? Somebody was born with this hunger for the better. I always wanted to create something spectacular. That’s why it’s called create spectacular.

If something doesn't kill you, it will at least make a good story. Click To Tweet

How do I create a spectacular life? If my life is a clay image that I’m creating and I’m putting new clay on every day, I’m scraping some off what I’ve done, the sculpture that’s done was my life, I want that to look spectacular. I want it to be awesome. I want to be able to say in the last second before I die, if I had one last thought I want to go, “That was awesome. That was a good life. That was a life worth living.” It should be a tough one.

It’s that trade-off. You always have yin and yang. Nothing comes without price and contrast. Especially with animals or relationships, there’s so much beauty about it but we understand that life is fragile. Things are going to happen. People are going to move.

Everything has a price. You said it right. Being healthy has a price you got to pay so as being sick. Having a great marriage, there’s a price to pay so as to divorce and it’s an expensive one. Being wealthy has a price. You have to work hard. To be poor also has a price.

I’m not sure where I learned this from but I look at marriage as a horrible way of looking at it. To me, it works where it’s a bank account where you could build up a massive amount of money in that bank account, say one thing and it’s all wrong. The same thing goes with business, with your health. You’re making an investment. You’re saving, putting things aside. Your passion is to eat chocolate or ice cream. You’re putting that aside but you’re building up your whole thing. We were talking about Jesse Itzler and Tony Robbins is the same thing.

They eat super healthy, strict and then their significant other is eating cheesecake or chocolate. This was one of those things where you could pay that price if you built up enough capital in that bank account. In businesses, it’s the same thing. Your team is like, “Kudos, rewards. You guys are amazing,” then you can be critical. It’s a high-interest debt.

TWS 22 | Change Your Life

Change Your Life: The hardest thing about business is when you thought somebody was going to go with you and they don’t. They have their life, and maybe they’re not on the same road as you anymore.

 

The toughest thing in business, I heard Dave Ramsey say this. When he said it, I was like, “I wish I’d thought of that.” He said, “What’s the hardest thing about being a business owner? The hardest thing is when you thought somebody was going to go with you and they don’t. Get on the train. What do you mean you’re not coming? I thought you were going to the end. I thought we were together.” It happens to all of us. If you do it long enough, they have their life and you thought that they were on the same road and when they’re not or when you find out even worse, they betrayed you. I’ve had that happen. They stole from you or betrayed you. It’s not about the money. It’s about what happens when somebody steals from you, what that means. That’s the hardest thing in business because I thought we were like this and they’re gone.

That’s another thing too with reputation and trust, you can spend years building. I can’t remember who said it, it’s gone in five minutes.

It takes a moment to ruin it. We’ve seen it and our society loves it. Our society hates a hero because there’s a hero, somebody who’s done great, they look at almost anything to find their fault. If you dig deep enough, we all have faults. We’re human.

What you see on the surface especially whether it’s social media or the news, there are so many surfaces out there but everybody has their demons, shortcomings and insecurity. It exists in everybody. It’s that compliment. You have two sides to it. That’s the price of it. It exists at all levels.

That’s part of the problem with social media is our way of social media life and it has a real life. It’s one of the things I love about Itzler’s wife so much. She doesn’t care. The question is, is she a billionaire so now she can do that or she becomes a billionaire because she’s just that way?

It’s one of those things where you oftentimes have an image to get something. You want to put yourself out there and portray yourself as something because you want something. When you realize that all you want is a good relationship with yourself, with God and with your spouse, you don’t need anything else so you’re able to be more real.

When you’re asking about the hunger part, what’s happened is the hunger’s matured over the years is I’m still plenty hungry. I can be pretty dang happy with exactly the way things are now. Nothing changed. I’m pretty happy. One of the difficulties we’ve had with the book and with Living Every Minute, the company, the concept is I don’t have a desire to be famous. I don’t want to go do 50 keynote speeches. I want to spend time with my wife and my family on the ranch and things. It’s a dichotomy of, “I want to get the word out and make sure people know about it because it’s life-changing and has helped a lot of people but at the same time,” I have no need for fame.

Don't just work in your life; work on your life. Click To Tweet

That’s a dichotomy that I’ve run into. I remember when we were talking about Will. We have a course called Gladiator. He’s read the book. He comes to Gladiator. He had a heart attack. He’s a great guy, a great person. As he starts to get better with himself and starts thinking about, “This is the only time I have to create spectacular with my family and my life,” he goes home. Maybe more than anybody else has come through the course. He went home and literally did housekeeping. He said, “Here’s my help. These are all the things I’m going to do. Here’s my relationship with my wife. Here’s the relationship with my kids.”

He literally made this like a workbook. We have a workbook that goes with it. He took a year and went through every chapter for a year. At the end of the year, he’s transformed his whole life. He had a great job but now he also has a side business and he took the leap of faith. He didn’t know if he could do it but he did. Now he’s got the side hustle that he does and he’s super proud of that. Seeing somebody transform their life like that, that’s the whole reward.

Usually, it’s a moment of decision where destiny is shaped. It’s that realization. When you have examples of experiences, you’ve had a ton of them being an emergency room MD where you see the fragileness of mortality and you realize, “This is all that I have. All I have is now. We work on some things to have a better experience.”

This is all we have. As far as I know, this is not a dress rehearsal. This is life. We got to make the most of it we can so it will be spectacular. We can say, “This is it. This is amazing.” What most people do is they live the zombie life that I talk about. They get up in the morning, “Twenty minutes to get to work, get my coffee down, get in the car, drive the exact same way I always drive, check-in my brain at this clock, go in, do the work that I have to do. Check out, go home, turn on the TV, pop a cold one, fall asleep in the chair, go to bed.” Every day is Tuesday. Every day starts to look like every other day.

TWS 22 | Change Your Life

Living Every Minute: Dr. Tim’s Pillars For Creating A Spectacular Life

People talk about, “Don’t just work in your business, work on your business. Don’t just work in your life, work on your life.” What we do with the Living Every Minute stuff and the courses we teach, we give people a chance, “Step away from your life for a few days and let’s work on it. Let’s work on the six pillars. Let’s work on your health, your wealth, your relationships, your mission. Is it okay? If it’s not okay. What can we do to shore that part up? Okay with who? It only matters if it’s okay with you. Are you okay with where it’s at? Do you think maybe you should do something different in that area?” What the whole concept is about is can you make it purposeful? Can you live on purpose, as people say? Can you do that instead of going through the motions and living every day?

I’m going to go back to whether it’s Will or others when they have that realization, is there anything else that they realize whether it’s about themselves, what they want, what they’ve been doing. What are some of those primary realizations people have that caused them to like, “I’m done. Enough. I’m making these significant changes?”

One of the things that people realize is that there are no real rules, whether we were at church or at home or at school or wherever it was, we were taught a bunch of rules. The reality is we’re all making this up. There are no rules. You can do whatever you want. That’s one of the major realizations that they go through. They’re like, “I was told all these things but I made those up. Those aren’t even real rules. I made them up in my head.” We’ll go through a rules evaluation. I know you’ve done a little of that probably with Tony’s stuff. We do it live with each person and go, “What are your rules? After, we’ll help you with that.”

They’re conflicting.

It’s crazy what people will do with themselves. They don’t even know they exist. If you get real with yourself, there’s an a-ha moment where you go, “I made all that up and I can redo the whole thing.” I would say, “That worked great to tell this moment in your life. Is that also going to be the thing that gets you where you want to go? If it is good on you, do that.”

The rule works.

If it’s not, think about it a little bit. Change the way you think about it.

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About Tim Reynolds, M.D.

Dr. Tim Reynolds is the President and CEO of Dr. Tim, International, a company he founded in 2009 to allow him to share his passion for Living Every Minute with others.

Dr Tim was a graduate of the Special Forces Q-course in July of 1982. He served as a Green Beret medic on an A-Team, as the Battalion medic and eventually as a Special Forces Battalion Surgeon for the 19th Special Forces Group (Airborne). He served both enlisted and as an officer from 1980 until 2000.

Dr. Tim graduated Summa Cum Laude with an MD degree from the University of Utah in 1993. He completed his Emergency Medicine residency at Texas A&M Scott and White in 1996 and is board certified in emergency medicine. Dr. Tim is the managing partner for HealthCARE Express, a group of urgent care clinics rapidly expanding across the United States.

Prior to starting HealthCARE Express in 2006, Dr. Tim held numerous positions across the medical field, including: medical director of the Wadley Regional Medical Center Emergency Department and Level II trauma center; director, Texas College of Emergency Physicians Board of Directors; President of E-Med Services, LLP and of E-Med Billing Solutions, LLP; associate clinical professor for the Area Health Education Center at the University of Arkansas; founding member of the Greater People’s Clinic of Texarkana Board of Directors.

Dr. Tim is also an entrepreneur and a successful businessman. He is currently the chief executive officer of TL Reynolds Properties, LLP, a real estate investment company; and he is a managing partner of JJET Developments Ltd., a real estate development company.

Dr. Tim enjoys spending time on his Ranch in Atlanta, Texas, where he lives with his wife, Pam, and their five amazing children. He holds a black belt in Tae Kwon Do, is a SCUBA rescue diver, and is a pilot. He also enjoys bodybuilding, golf, and hiking.

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Living Every Minute: Enjoy The Time You Have Now With Tim Reynolds, M.D.

TWS 21 | Living Every Minute

 

The past is a great place to learn from, but it’s gone. It won’t do us any good to dwell on it. Patrick Donohoe introduces Tim Reynolds, M.D., the Founder of Living Every Minute. Tim talks with Patrick about how many people dwell in the past, which is not a great place to live. Are you afraid of the future? Don’t be. We don’t even know if it’s coming! We’re all just passing through this life, so let’s enjoy the time we have and the gifts we were given.

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Living Every Minute: Enjoy The Time You Have Now With Tim Reynolds, M.D.

This episode is sponsored by the new and improved Financial Independence Calculator found at TheWealthStandard.com/calculator. One of the driving forces of human beings is freedom, which infers financial freedom too. Years ago, I set out to discover how any individual, regardless of their financial situation, could evaluate their finances in five minutes or less and have a firm date when they could achieve financial independence. The latest version of this calculator, which is free for the audience, can be found at TheWealthStandard.com/calculator. The calculator is going to take you only a few minutes to complete and it’s going to provide you with a specific financial independence date. Go check it out.

The following five episodes are with businessmen, investor, doctor and author Tim Reynolds. The interview was in person. It was in my office. If you’re reading the episodes and want to watch the videos, go head over to TheWealthStandard.com. It’ll have a link there. When the five segments are complete, we’re going to post the entire interview on our YouTube channel. Make sure you check that out.

A little bit about Tim. Tim is a former Green Beret in the Special Forces. He was a medic and also a battalion surgeon. He graduated from Texas A&M with his Medical degree. His specialization was Emergency Medicine. He was an emergency room doctor for several years and also co-started a company called HealthCARE Express. He has 15 or 16 locations throughout Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana.

He has his book. You can check it out on Amazon. It’s called Living Every Minute. It’s also on Audible. He reads the Audible audiobook. Tim is an amazing guy. He’s one of the first original platinum partners with Tony Robbins. His love and zest for life is throughout his book. It’s going to be throughout this interview. You can imagine in the roles that he’s played, he has experienced firsthand the fragility of life. He’s going to share some of those experiences throughout these five segments.

I want to forewarn you. This is a PG 13-ish interview. There’s some colorful language and there are also some relatively graphic stories that Tim tells but you are going to experience him, his heart and his passion for life. You can check his website out. It’s LivingEveryMinute.com. He has some personal development programs, courses and a lot of other resources that you will want to check out. Go head over there. Without further delay, let’s start episode one with my dear friend, Tim Reynolds.

What led to the title and maybe describe what the philosophy is of that title?

Living Every Minute is something that I came up with years ago. The concept or the idea was the past is gone. It’s a great place to learn from but it’s gone. There isn’t anything you can do about it and yet so many people live there or dwell. It’s not a great place to live. It’s a nice place to visit and a great place to learn from. The future is unknown. Maybe this might be your last interview. There’s an earthquake. We leave here and the building falls down. This is it. We never know. The future is uncertain.

It’s something we should plan for because if it’s coming, your business and all businesses knows, you need to have a plan for that. It’s also not a place you want to live. The whole Living Every Minute philosophy has learned from the past, plan for the future and then once you’ve done those two things, spend your time living every minute, in this minute, in this time because this is the only day we get. As far as we know, this is it.

TWS 21 | Living Every Minute

Living Every Minute: Dr. Tim’s Pillars for Creating a Spectacular Life

I’m making this as an assumption that being an emergency room doc wasn’t your average family practice where you had. This is a routine thing. You didn’t know what to expect on a day-to-day basis. Some of the stories you tell pull on the heartstrings, some of the kids’ stories or the older depressed people’s stories. What’s your experience as an emergency room doc? Is that what credit or played a part?

It’s certainly a big part. I would see people who would come in. I was putting the philosophy together in my head at that time. I didn’t have that completely yet but I would see, “I hope they kissed him goodbye this morning.” They were in a fight. He took off in the car and killed himself or we have a guy who came in and this isn’t in the book. He went to the doctor and the doctor said, “You have prostate cancer.” For those of you who don’t know, prostate cancer is very slow-growing. You’ll have prostate cancer for 20, 30 years sometimes. Usually, you’ll die of something else before you die of prostate cancer.

All this gentleman heard was cancer. He went home, took his 45, drove out in the field and shot himself in the head. I was like, “I hope he remembered to tell everybody.” The whole philosophy, I would see case after case like this of these tragedies that would happen as you say. You start realizing this is the only day. It’s all that we have and know about, for sure. If you waste this minute, this day or this time living, regretting something you did, wishing you would have done something else or so obsessed about what might happen, which is our society, “What might happen? What does this mean,” then you forget to have gratitude for where you’re at.

It comes to our perspective of life where we think we’re going to live forever. There are examples of people everywhere. We have medicine and competitive things. Life isn’t as dangerous as it was even years ago. You have stories that we hear but nobody realized it. They say, “That will never happen to me.” Therefore, you think as far as the future is concerned, they dwell on the past. They don’t operate at the moment.

The antithesis, particularly during these last years, was everybody so afraid. They went from thinking they were going to live forever to thinking that just walking past somebody is going to kill them. Both of those two are bad. We have this great moment that we’re in that we can live well. Nobody lives her life. We’re all dying. Let’s enjoy the time we have. The gifts were given. God gives us our health, our body, where we live and our family. We give back to God the things we do with those things. What do we make and do with those things? That’s the Living Every Minute philosophy.

The past is a great place to learn from, but it's gone. Yet many people dwell there. It's not a great place to live. Click To Tweet

What are maybe some of the other major impact points of your life that led you down the path to some of the careers?

One of the biggest was I’m the oldest of six kids. My dad was a truck driver. Mom was a stay-at-home mom and so we didn’t have a lot of money. The good news is nobody around us had any money either so we didn’t know we didn’t have any money. I became obsessed with this idea over time especially as I got into high school. I was like, “I don’t like being poor.” I don’t like it. I can do it but I see people with this abundance. I never went through the period where I hated those people. I went through the period of thinking, “How do I get that? How do I get some more of that?”

I became obsessed with the idea of how do I do that? How do I get to that point? That was a big thing that led my life. I remember at eighteen years old telling my girlfriend at the time. She said, “What are you going to do with your life?” Here I am at eighteen, I said, “I’d like to be a doctor. I’d like to travel the world. I’d like to own a ranch with horses and cows. I’d like to have a house in the mountains and on the beach.” She said, “You already thought of all that?” I’m like, “No, just right now. That’s what I decided. Those are the five things I want to do.” Then I want to build a financial empire. Those are my six things.

I look back years later, that’s what I did. It’s amazing to me. I didn’t have any benefit of anybody else. My mom had me when she was sixteen years old. My dad was sixteen. I’m the first Reynolds in the history of my family to graduate from high school. Let alone go to college. It’s not like I had some advantage but I became obsessed with the idea. Years later, I have a financial empire. We have a house in the mountains and on a beach. We have a ranch with horses and cattle. I’m a doctor and we traveled the world into 65 countries.

What kept the fuel going in that obsession?

It’s hunger. Always being hungry for what else could we do? How else could we create? When a lot of people say they don’t like to work hard, I was the opposite. If I’m awake, I might as well be working. Work was my friend. If you think about it, work’s gotten you everything you have. Why would that not be your best friend? Everything I have come from work. I didn’t become scared of work. It became my friend. I learned how to moderate that later on but in the beginning, it was full work. I remember when I started college, I’d already been in the military so I came back as behind. I was already 22 going on 23.

When you catch on to something that succeeds, keep doing it. Click To Tweet

I remember going up to the school. This is a funny story. It’s not in the book. I didn’t know anything about college. I lived here in First South, Salt Lake in the ’90s in a little 400-square-foot apartment. I had a car. It was a 1968 Chevelle convertible. It’s a beautiful car. My dad got it when he was in Vietnam and I bought it from him. I drove it all the time when I was in the military and came back. I drove up to college, up to the University of Utah.

I walked into the admissions office and said, “I want to go to college. What do I have to do?” She said, “First of all, you have to get your high school transcripts.” I said, “I can do that.” She said, “You have to get ACT score.” I said, “I don’t know what that is.” I went to the high school where they don’t do that because nobody goes to college from my high school. She tells me what it is and I said, “Do I need to study for it or what is it?” She said, “You can.” “When can I take it?” She said, “You can take it tomorrow if you want.” I said, “I’ll take it tomorrow.”

I go in the next day. I take the ACT test. I did well, weirdly. I’ve been out of school for five years. She said, “We got the transcript. Here’s what you’re going to do.” I said, “Can I start school on Monday?” I didn’t know there were semesters that you had to wait. She said, “You got to wait until this semester.” I didn’t know anything about college. I just knew I wanted to go. She says, “I got everything arranged. I got all hooked up.” I said, “How much is the tuition?” She said, “$1,600.”

This was in 1984 and $1,600 tuition for this semester. They were quarters back then so $1,600 for the quarter. She might as well have said $16 million. I went and called a friend of mine. I said, “You still have that 1968 Chevelle?” He’s like, “Yes.” I said, “$1,600.” He said, “Done.” He gave me $1,600 cash. I drove up to the University of Utah. I got $1,600 cash and that’s how I went to school. I always thought to myself, “Find a way.” I didn’t know I was going to pay for the next semester but then I knew I had to so I started getting jobs and one thing led to another.

The only way to get better at something is to be bad at it for a while. Click To Tweet

I assume that you had obstacles along the way. Were there points in the business where you had this vision, this grandiose plan and you had to fight pretty hard for it, that work maybe wasn’t the only variable that led to the success?

There’s a thing we underestimate. I’m sure you know this as well. We underestimate how much we fail. When we look back, we only like talking about the things we succeeded at but I would bet if I look in my business career or in my life, I’d failed at 80% of things I’ve tried, at least. That 20% was worth it. I’ve probably tried twenty different businesses and 200 different things in each of those businesses. Most of those things within those businesses fail but when you catch on, something succeeds. You then keep doing that thing. You say, “Do you know what would be a great idea?” It turns out not to be a great idea but it sounds like it.

If you take ten things, they all look the same and you say, “This could be good. Let’s go down this path,” here’s what’s going to happen. Two of them are going to be dogs. Six of them are just going to sit there, not do much and two are going to be great. You can’t tell at the beginning which of those tenants is going to do those things. I hate it when people try something and say, “I already tried that. It’s not going to work.” I’m like, “You know how not to do it.” It’s Thomas Edison, “9,999 light bulbs won’t work.” I’m going to make the tenth.

I had a guy who came up to me and said, “You’d like to invest in real estate?” I said, “Yes.” He said, “Is real estate the best investment?” I said, “The best investment is whatever you’re good at.” He said, “I would never do real estate.” I said, “Why not?” He said, “I bought two houses. They were rental properties. I found out after I bought them, the roofs were bad. How to replace the roofs when I never got my money?” I said, “You know how to inspect roofs now? Good job. You’re the perfect guy to go buy two more places.” He would never do it again.

You have some programs we’ll get to that you coach people. You take people through experiences based on your experiences. What do you find as the biggest obstacles that hold people back? People want these end results and where they’re at but then there’s a gap in between.

TWS 21 | Living Every Minute

Living Every Minute: Be hungry for what you can do. How else can you create?

 

It’s fear of failure. People are so afraid of the very thing that we talked about. People don’t realize that every single thing you’re good at, at one time you were bad at, from tying your shoe to eating with a fork. The first time you tie your shoe, you suck at it but you keep tying your shoe and until now, you don’t even think about it when you tie your shoe. That’s how we get better at something. I love this analogy.

When I give a talk, I’ll say, “How many in this room speak a foreign language?” Usually, about 10% of the room raised their hand, unless you’re Utah and in Emory. I said, “How many would like to?” Everybody raises their hand. I said, “Let me ask you a question. Why don’t you speak a foreign language? Is it because there are not enough apps or there are not enough classes? You can’t find an internet site that teaches it?” There are millions of ways to learn a language so why did 99% of people want to learn one but only 10% of people know one?

It boils down to one thing if you think about it. You don’t want to look stupid. In order to learn a foreign language, you have to look stupid for a while. You’re not going to sound good. You’re going to sound terrible but in order to learn it, you have to sound terrible until you get better. That’s a great analogy for everything we do in life. I was bad at writing this book. I was terrible at it. It took me a lot longer than it should. I knew I had a book in me that needed to come out. I sat at my house in Jackson Hall and typed for twenty days. I wrote the whole book in twenty days.

Unfortunately, it was all over the place. There were no chapters and organization. The editing took two years because that’s not the way to do it. The way you do it is to do an outline and then you decide what chapters you’re going to have. If I were to do it again, that’s how I would do it. I unloaded everything I taught for the last years and keep typing. I was with this mess of 200 pages I didn’t know what to do with.

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About Tim Reynolds, M.D.

Dr. Tim Reynolds is the President and CEO of Dr. Tim, International, a company he founded in 2009 to allow him to share his passion for Living Every Minute with others.

Dr Tim was a graduate of the Special Forces Q-course in July of 1982. He served as a Green Beret medic on an A-Team, as the Battalion medic and eventually as a Special Forces Battalion Surgeon for the 19th Special Forces Group (Airborne). He served both enlisted and as an officer from 1980 until 2000.

Dr. Tim graduated Summa Cum Laude with an MD degree from the University of Utah in 1993. He completed his Emergency Medicine residency at Texas A&M Scott and White in 1996 and is board certified in emergency medicine. Dr. Tim is the managing partner for HealthCARE Express, a group of urgent care clinics rapidly expanding across the United States.

Prior to starting HealthCARE Express in 2006, Dr. Tim held numerous positions across the medical field, including: medical director of the Wadley Regional Medical Center Emergency Department and level II trauma center; director, Texas College of Emergency Physicians Board of Directors; president of E-Med Services, LLP and of E-Med Billing Solutions, LLP; associate clinical professor for the Area Health Education Center at the University of Arkansas; founding member of the Greater People’s Clinic of Texarkana Board of Directors.

Dr. Tim is also an entrepreneur and successful businessman. He is currently the chief executive officer of TL Reynolds Properties, LLP, a real estate investment company; and he is a managing partner of JJET Developments Ltd., a real estate development company.

Dr. Tim enjoys spending time on his Ranch in Atlanta, Texas, where he lives with his wife, Pam, and their five amazing children. He holds a black belt in Tae Kwon Do, is a SCUBA rescue diver, and a pilot. He also enjoys body building, golf, and hiking.

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Wealth Is The Result Of Your Relationship With Challenges

Life compels us to move forward and to grow, although there’s uniqueness and variety. We may not know what tomorrow is going to bring, but we can still choose to show up to the life we are given and strive to rise despite the challenges. After all, strength and growth come only through continuous effort and struggle. In this episode, Patrick Donohoe explains the importance of understanding the principles of growth through embracing challenges. He discusses adversity, obstacles, struggles, challenge, and friction. This is the perfect time to encourage yourself to embrace challenges when they come. Recognize the opportunity to do it strategically so you could unleash your potential and even create successful investment decisions.

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Wealth Is The Result Of Your Relationship With Challenges

One of the driving forces of human beings is freedom, which infers financial freedom too. Several years ago, I set out to discover how any individual, regardless of their financial situation, could evaluate their finances in five minutes or less and have a firm date when they could achieve financial independence. The latest version of this calculator, which is free for readers, can be found at TheWealthStandard.com/calculator. The calculator is going to take you just a few minutes to complete and it’s going to provide you with a specific financial independence date. Go check it out now.

Every individual of humanity lives a unique life. There are similarities but ultimately, each life is distinctly different. Billions of people are all distinctly different. We have these uniquely defining characteristics that then show up to new sets of circumstances and experiences on a daily basis. The nature of which is continually compelling us to move forward and grow. Although there’s so much of this uniqueness and variety, there are constants. There are these universal laws or principles that govern the results we get from growing.

You’re reading a wealth and personal finance show and that has been the focus for years. To me, that signals that you’re compelled to grow in some way, going from where you are financially to a new level. It’s natural to be compelled to grow continually. Growth requires a path of following these laws and principles. Following these constants cannot be circumvented. You can’t go around it. In this path, some of these principles and laws are the riddling of pressure, adversity, obstacles, struggles, challenges and friction. It applies in pretty much all finance but to this audience, to your earning potential and also to successful investment decisions.

You have to push through these obstacles in order to grow to success. Napoleon Hill, a great quote along these lines says, “Strength and growth come only through continuous effort and struggle.” To me, what this means is strength, in essence, amplifies your efforts. The degree of your efforts is going to determine how you face the specific challenge friction in question. It determines whether you embrace it as something that’s part of growth or rebel against it because you don’t understand the law or principle.

I’ll give you a physical example. I’ve worked out at the same CrossFit gym for many years. CrossFit is relatively rigorous. This applies to just exercise in general. I’ve come to understand that there’s this crossover point that people that do it for the long run have to push through a threshold. It’s the point where you go from, “I can’t stand up. Every part of my body is aching. My body is telling me, ‘What the heck are you doing to me?'” You can’t walk down the stairs. You can hardly get out of bed.

The individual of humanity lives a unique life. Each life is distinctly different. Click To Tweet

When you break through that threshold, do you look at workouts the next morning and your body wants to do it. It’s like, “I can’t wait to get the kick out of me tomorrow.” When you hear someone say, “I hate working out. I can never get up that early. I don’t have time.” To me, these statements signify rebellion from a challenge because that threshold has not been crossed. They’ve not understood these principles or laws of growth.

In CrossFit, I’ve come to realize that a new person must do it for at least six months until they break this threshold. Typically, that’s eighteen months where they go from hating it to loving it. Typically, that threshold is not crossed because of the pain and ultimately, no one is able to experience the other side. I believe you can grow from those same laws and principles applied to psychological growth. Like a physical muscle, you can grow that same type of mental strength. You can come to love the challenges of life, frictions of life, difficulties of life, as well as the subsequent pain. The principle is almost identical.

The feelings are what’s processed in your mind both physical and mental. All of that is processed. I believe you can continually develop mental strength through consistent and ongoing exercise. It’s not physical exercise. Let me give you some examples of exercise. Psychological workout is done through personal development whether it’s reading books, listening to podcasts, taking courses, training, having a personal coach or business coach, going to seminars, events and so forth. Things that push you to those thresholds.

When those muscles are exercising strong, you can show up to life and embrace those challenging experiences. Hope for them because you know what’s on the other side. There are mental obstacles but ultimately, you embrace every moment of the experience because you know what it’s going to lead you to. For those of us in the last few episodes, I participated in an endurance event called 29029. That number symbolizes the elevation of Mount Everest.

This event consists of a pretty crazy feat. You have to hike up and down a mountain numerous times until you reach that 29,000 feet of elevation and you have only 36 hours to do it. The event took place at a ski resort about an hour from Salt Lake called Snowbasin. The elevation gain of each hike was roughly 2,300 feet, with a distance on each hike of 2.3 miles. It’s a straight uphill hike and you do it thirteen times. I started at 6:00 in the morning on Friday. I ended at about 1:00 PM on Saturday but I had until 6:00 PM on Saturday to finish.

TWS 20 | Embracing Challenges

Embracing Challenges: Start exercising so that you don’t do it out of shape when you show up to these challenges. You don’t do it malnourished. You do it strongly. And when it comes, you can pivot. You can be agile. You can embrace them.

On the first day, the adrenaline and excitement were there. I completed ten hikes on the first day. I hiked from 6:00 in the morning to 1:00 in the morning. It was 6:00 AM all the way through the evening to 1:00 PM. You hike up. You take a fifteen-minute gondola ride down, where I got in the habit of eating and getting some food in my body but went through ten straight. It was brutal. I was seeing things at the end like hallucinating. I had to go to bed, wake up the next morning and then complete the final three hikes on Saturday.

I’m going to open you guys up. I was reluctant to do this but I recorded some audio notes of actual videos during the event. The second part of this episode is going to consist of that compilation of those few videos when I was right in the thick of it. The reason why I did this event is that I knew I was going to face extreme pain and threshold where my body was going to tell me, “Stop. You need to quit. This isn’t normal. You can’t do this to me.” It happened multiple times. You’re going to read about it in these videos that I recorded while doing the event.

The reason was personal growth. I wanted to grow or face these thresholds because I understand the principles of growth. I would be lying to say that I always look forward to challenges, obstacles and friction because of these unique experiences that we have on a daily basis, you don’t know what life is going to throw at you to grow. I’m not saying that I completely embrace all the difficulties of my life but here is a time and an opportunity I had to do it strategically where I knew I was going to face these challenges.

I knew it was going to be a struggle. My body would signal my mind, “Stop. You can’t do this. What are you doing to me?” I wanted to, number one, push through some additional thresholds because we all have a threshold. It’s like this continual threshold. Once we’re there, there’s going to be another one. That was one of my goals but I also did it for my kids, who, as you’ll see in some of the videos, we’re able to walk across the finish line with me. I wanted to demonstrate to them that inside of them are the same genes as mine but also human genes that can overcome challenging things and difficulties.

I have two teenage daughters. There are lots of emotional things going on in their life. I did this event because, even though it’s not the same challenge, there are parallels. I also did it for you, whoever is reading right now. I’ve seen amazing things in people. Those that are in CrossFit make it through the threshold and it changes their life. It changed my life. I’ve also seen it in business whether it’s with employees or clients. Seeing thousands of people face some extremely difficult circumstances but push through it and grow and then start to connect the principles and laws of growth to those challenges and what they became because of it.

Life compels us to grow, and it's going to give us obstacles. Click To Tweet

The purpose was to encourage and inspire you to not just embrace challenges when they come because we don’t know what tomorrow is going to bring or the next day. We just know that life compels us to grow and it’s going to give us obstacles and challenges. Start exercising the muscle so that when you show up to these challenges, you don’t do it out of shape and malnourished. You do it strong and when it comes, you can pivot. You can be agile. You can embrace them even though they may be challenging at first.

I did it to inspire you to take some action whether it’s signing up for one of these physical events. They’re all over the place, marathons, half-marathons and 5Ks. You can find them anywhere. You have endurance races and obstacle races. I believe that these physical challenges parallel well with the psychological challenges that we face. In the end, if you get strong physically, it doesn’t mean that you’re going to be successful financially but there is a parallel because what led to a strong physique and body, the same principle is applied to strong psychology, mental wherewithal.

That allows us to break through to these levels in which we can create massive value for people. We can show up to life happy, fulfilled, motivated and ultimately achieve and continue to achieve the levels of wealth that will create a rewarding life. It was rewarding. I’m very blessed to have been able to participate in it. I’m glad you guys are reading. I hope you learned something. I hope you were now inspired and motivated to go find something that physically challenges you whether it’s an event, hiring a coach or it’s something business-wise. Continue to push those limits and strengthen those muscles. I know you can do it. We’ll see you in the next episode.

This is journal entry number one. I just completed my sixth summit. The event is you have 36 hours to do thirteen summits. Each summit is 2.3 miles and 2,300 feet of elevation. It’s pretty rough. It’s a lot more difficult than I thought. There are these super steep parts of the trail. I’m on a gondola. I’m playing on my strategy. What I’m thinking is doing another 2, maybe 1 at dinner and then try to get 10 before the end of the day, which will leave me a good amount of time so I can get 5 to 6 hours of sleep. That’s the plan. I’ll do another journal entry when I’m done now.

TWS 20 | Embracing Challenges

Embracing Challenges: There are these universal laws or principles that govern the results we get from growing. You’re compelled to grow going from where you are right now, financially, to a new level.

This is journal entry number two. It was impossible. Nothing is impossible but I finished at about 1:00 AM in my tenth summit. I was super exhausted but I had two lessons from yesterday. In the first trail, my body was feeling it big time. I was feeling undernourished. In every step, I was feeling it in my calves and hip flexors. Something happened going through the sixth time, where I got a second wind. What’s interesting in our body is it’s not biologically designed for the life we get to live. It’s meant to be stressed. It’s meant to push limitations. We’re meant to walk and run. We’re meant to deal with physical strain. I felt that it was incredible and I did three.

After the fifth summit, I did three more before dinner and then I had some dinner. I think I ate too much and then I did two more before I went to bed. When I was finishing the final summit, someone had this little board where each time you summit they have this hot iron that you brand this wooden board every time you summit. Someone had mistakenly put my tenth summit there already. As I was going to put my brand, I saw it and then I was like, “That’s not right.” They were like, “You have to put it in the eleventh.” I was like, “No.”

First off, my mind was like, “Do it, just put it.” I put it on the eleventh one then you’ll only have to do the two tomorrow. It was incredible. I think sometimes our body sends messages to us when we’re dealing with stress, pain or anxiety. It operates for us, protecting us with survival instincts. It was interesting that sometimes, specifically that night, where my mind went to do that, “You only have to do two.” I didn’t do that. I did two already and I’m headed down the gondola to do number thirteen. I feel amazing and my family is going to meet me at the top. It was a great journey. It was a fun experience.

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Life Lessons From Strangers: Discovering The Keys To Success By Connecting With People

TWS 19 | Successful Life

 

There’s so much to learn from every individual we meet. The right connection with the right individual might unlock the secret to a successful life. In this episode, Patrick Donohoe shares two eye-opening conversations he had with two individuals who are very different yet equally successful in their own ways. He details his chance encounter with renowned golf course architect and designer Robert Trent Jones Jr., who is still filled with so much passion for his job at 84 years old. In another interaction, Patrick recounts his meeting with former NFL player and Hall of Famer Emmit Smith, now a sought-after speaker and best-selling author. Tune in as Patrick shares the valuable life lessons he received from these great individuals and why it’s important to connect with the people around us.

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Life Lessons From Strangers: Discovering The Keys To Success By Connecting With People

Tony Robbins has said that the eyes are the gateway to the soul. I’m about to participate in an event in Northern Utah called 29029 Everesting, which is essentially hiking up a mountain multiple times until you reach the elevation of Mount Everest. It’s done in about a dozen locations around the country. At least it was previous to COVID just a handful of times this year.

I just came from a conference on the island of Hawaii, and so I did not have time to be in my office and record an episode for the week, but I’m going to record some audio sound blips as I hike up and down this mountain because it is challenging and specifically commenting on the nature of being in this team environment where there’s another 100 or some people hiking with you, encouraging you and just some of the success stories that come from it.

I wanted to do is comment real bridge last episode with this event that I’m doing with two conversations I had with Hall of Fame individuals. One is a professional athlete, which most of you will know. Another is also a Hall of Fame individual in the Golf Hall of Fame, who you may not know. When I was at this conference, I had the opportunity to play golf. It’s a famous course called Poipu. The Poipu Golf Club is a PGA event that’s held there. It’s a beautiful golf course. The grounds are incredible they have these two ocean holes that are magnificent. I got to play it a couple of years ago and it was a joy to play it again.

As we were leaving the 18th hole, there was an individual that approached us. He was in a golf cart, somewhat to disheveled this old green golf hat and wrinkly. You could tell that it been worn a million times. He was driving along the path. We were exiting and he was older in age, and he asked, “How’d you guys like the round of golf? How’d you like the course?” We were like, “It was incredible. I played here before and these were their first time playing. It was beautiful. It rained a little bit.” He was like, “This is one of the most famous courses or the most favorite courses that I’ve designed.”

I was like shocked. The individual next to me is like, “Did you helped with the grounds crew? Did you helped build it?” He’s like, “No. I designed this course.” This gentleman that I was playing golf with is an avid golfer and knows golf history. His son plays on a NCAA Division one team back East. He’s like, “What’s your name?” He said, “My name is Robert Trent Jones Jr.”

My partner was like, “No way.” He had probably a dozen bud lights by that point, maybe a few more. He said, “Show me your driver’s license,” to get him to approve it. This guy, which I’m sure that was not anticipating that question, opened up his wallet and didn’t have his driver’s license on him, but he had an American Express Black Card that said Robert Trent Jones Jr. on it.

Hunger is a never-ending principle of life. Click To Tweet

We got to laugh out of that, but then we start a conversation and he had this journal that he was showing us that mapped out a lot of the courses that he designed. It showed some of the drawings. He’s written poems about the golf courses that he’s designed anywhere from Indonesia to Hawaii. He was up in Hawaii doing a redesign of a golf course in Princeville, which is in the Northern part of Kauai. He’s been in Mexico. He’s been all over the world designing hundreds and hundreds of golf courses and his father, Robert Trent Jones Sr., I think he did an upwards of 600 either designs or redesigns of golf courses. It was in the family. It was becoming a legacy.

We’d have this conversation, and I remember it distinctly where he started opening up his book and looking at us. I looked straight into his eyes and it was an unbelievable connection where I saw how much this man loved what he did. As he was flipping through his journal and diary, there were pages that were earmarked. Clearly, the book had been used many times to show other individuals, but it was truly inspiring to have a conversation with the man who discovered his calling in life, and he wasn’t done. I think he’s 83 years old, almost 84. You could tell that he lives in breathes what he was meant to do in life and it was an incredible lesson.

I mentioned in the episode that when we connect with people, whether it’s a stranger in line at the coffee shop, someone at the airport or someone at a restaurant, those are people that we’re meant to meet. You may not think that. You may be skeptical, but there’s a stoic idea around the fact that the people we come in contact with, we are meant to communicate with them.

We’re meant to connect with them. At least I speak for myself. Don’t take the opportunity to do that at a deep level. I connected with this individual, Robert Trent Jones Jr., through his eyes and saw how powerfully he loved his life. How much he loved doing what he did. He got to travel all around the world. He was at this golf course because there was a group behind us that was playing.

They’re part of the golf club there and he was going to show them some of the designs for the golf course up in Northern Hawaii. As he ended our conversation, I started to have a conversation with them, he didn’t skip a beat as far as the passion and the excitement that he had for what he was going to do and talk about golf, golf courses and golf course design with these gentlemen who also had, apparently, a passion for golf. That was my first interaction and my connection.

The second one was with a Hall of Fame running back for the Dallas Cowboys name Emmitt Smith. Many of you will recognize that name. He was a guest speaker at the conference I was at. There were two phases of our conference. We were at phase one. There was another phase two and another group of people coming in after us.

TWS 19 | Successful Life

Successful Life: When we connect with people, whether it’s a stranger in line at the coffee shop or someone at the airport or at a restaurant, those are people that we’re meant to meet.

 

He was the last speaker on the morning. We were departing and he was going to speak that evening to the other group that was coming in. There were only a few people there, and many people had already left on their flights but there are 25 to 30 people in the room. It was a general question and answer, and he talks about two distinct things. He talked about the team and the idea of hunger, the principle of hunger. I didn’t get to ask him any questions there. I didn’t get to interact with him personally.

After this little speaking engagement, we are checking out of our room and went to have breakfast. My family went to have breakfast. I went to the gym and, lo and behold, as I was getting my workout underway, Emmitt Smith walks in and gets on the Peloton bike that was right next to me and started doing his workout.

I said, “I enjoyed his talk in the morning. I was grateful that he was there,” then I get into my workout. We talked for about an hour and a half. When I was done, he was getting out of his workout and we were the only ones in the gym. I went up to him. He didn’t have any water bottle with him, so I gave him some water. I said, “I really enjoyed your talk this morning. There are two things that I took from it, and I’m super grateful because I have been thinking along these lines lately.”

The first thing was the idea of teamwork. I told him, “What I’ve discovered in some of the most successful businesses, including my business, are those that have participated in successful teams in the past, and most of it is through sports teams, especially at a very high level, maybe high school but collegiate or professional levels.” There’s an individual that’s on my team at Paradigm, who was a Commander of a Navy Submarine for twenty years and retired as a Commander.

The idea of teamwork within the military is profound. The success, as far as individuals are concerned, comes from how they see their role on their team. That’s what he spoke to that morning, whether it’s Terrell Owens or other athletes who are very individualistic, egotistic and don’t operate that well on teams that tend to ruin the culture of a team.

Emmitt Smith, even though he was individually accomplished, he accredited a large part of his success to his team. The second principle was the idea of hunger. I said, “Hunger is fleeting because you can be hungry and it drives you for a moment, but when that moment is gone and when achievement is made, that hunger no longer gives you the drive for the next level.” He’s like, “I totally agree.”

Never discount the moments of opportunity where you're able to connect with somebody. Click To Tweet

Hunger is a never-ending principle of life. Finding something to be hungry about, passionate about driven to accomplish or to achieve. I said, “With teamwork and hunger, did you know that as you exited the NFL?” He’s like, “No. I experienced it, but I didn’t understand how teamwork applied to business.” Now he’s a successful real estate developer in Texas and a couple of other areas I believe but the idea of hunger where he had hit all of these major levels in his professional career and getting to those levels and more levels just wasn’t possible anymore. Hunger, drive, and the why behind his new achievements had to be discovered, and it’s a never-ending process because once another level is hit, it’s again circling back and finding something else to be hungry about.

The lessons from these two interactions are as follows. First, you don’t ever know who you’re going to meet, and just like I had this eye contact and presence, which I’ve been working on a lot over the last couple of years with Robert Trent Jones Sr., I did the same thing with Emmitt Smith where most people wouldn’t go up to him and start a conversation with them.

I didn’t start the conversation. I was like, “I know you love golfing. Let’s go golf before you leave and before I leave.” He declined because he had to give a speech that night, but recognizing that all human beings are the same in a sense, and they all, mostly at least love connection and love conversation. The fact that I went up to him is something I probably would’ve done a couple of years ago.

Knowing that connection is deeply important to me now, and specifically being able to connect and understand eye contact, presence and being there, the energy is profound and palpable. It was only about a 30-minute conversation I had with Emmitt Smith, but the idea is, when you’re able to connect at that level and have common ground that you agree upon and speak to, especially when it comes to principals, it’s a conversation I’ll never forget with both of those individuals.

That’s the first thing is never discount the moments of opportunity where you’re able to connect with somebody. It could be a Robert Trent Jones Sr. It could be Robert Trent Jones Jr. It could be Emmitt Smith. You’ll never know. As I mentioned, it could be a billionaire or your next business partner. It’s someone that can inspire you to take your life to the next level.

You don’t know but what you do know and if you can operate your life on this belief, a good call-to-action is to consider all of the connections and relationships that you have with people. When you interact with somebody, consider that as something that was meant to be and that moment as something that you were destined to fulfill. How are you going to fulfill that conversation? Are you going to be present? Are you going to have eye contact? Are you going to engage? There’s so much fulfillment that comes from that level of communication and conversation.

TWS 19 | Successful Life

Successful Life: Seek out passion. Seek out something to be excited about when it comes to your vocation. Your zest of life is amplified when you participate in that.

 

The second is find something that lights you up in the morning. I would say seek not find. Find is a singular event. Seek out passion or something to be excited about when it comes to your vocation. Seek out like Robert Trent Jones Sr. something that your blood pressure raises your excitement level. Your zest for life is amplified when you’re able to participate in that.

Two more things, teamwork. Know your role on a team. Be part of a team. Even in business, we may think we have individual titles, responsibilities, and positions but we’re part of a team in a number of ways by understanding that other people play different roles and complement ours. It’s also being there when times are tough and willing to accept, help and support when times are tough for you.

The last thing is hunger. Know your why. I would say a very simple first principles idea behind success is your hunger. It’s that driving force behind why you’re doing what you’re doing. Hunger could be a level of lifestyle that allows you to take your family to places and experience things with your spouse. It may be individual, able to golf every Saturday, have a membership at a country club, or provide charitable contributions even time to cause you’re passionate about.

Find something to be hungry about. That hunger and why is going to drive you through the inevitable friction, difficulty and challenge. That stands in the way between where you are right now and what you want to accomplish and achieve. Guys, thank you for reading. You’re amazing. I appreciate the support. Check-in with the next episode, where you’ll know a compilation from this physical challenge I’m about to embark on. Until then.

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Life Is On The Other Side Of Fear

TWS 18 | Other Side Of Fear

 

How many times has fear held us up? How many opportunities did we miss just because we were too afraid to try? It is time to overcome that and start living life. As Patrick Donohoe highlights in this episode, life is on the other side of fear. He further elaborates that by pushing our fear thresholds, we realize that we can do more. Life demands growth, and if we hold ourselves back, we can’t possibly get to the life we are meant to live. Join Patrick in today’s show, where he shares his own experiences and lessons learned that you could apply in every aspect of life.

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Life Is On The Other Side Of Fear

Everything you could possibly want out of life is on the other side of fear. I want to qualify that statement. I got some feedback that my head was in the cloud. I was not aware of what was going on in the world because of what I was choosing to focus the topics of this show on. I get it. I understand why someone would say something like that. There’s a lot going on. My intent is not to propagate ignorance. This show rarely, if ever, touches on circumstances and experiences that are outside of our control. In the Middle East, there’s always going to be conflict. There’s been for a long time. There are also things going on in government that are sad but that’s been the case for a long time. We don’t have control over monetary policy, fiscal policy, COVID. We don’t have control over policy.

We don’t have control over whether there’s quarantine or not. There are so many things that we think there’s a solution of control and influence and we get all worked up about it. I choose to focus on the things that I can’t control. The qualifier is everything that we could possibly want out of life is on the other side of the fear that we have control and influence over. In all aspects of life, there’s a gap between where we are now and where we want to be. Those are the two points. There’s a gap in between. That gap is laced, typically with some degree of fear. Fear of failure, success, pain, of what others will think of you if you succeed, of what others will think of you if you fail, and of what success or failure will mean to yourself image when you believe about yourself.

Life commands and demands growth. Click To Tweet

The irony is that when we toe the line with this fear, there’s another fear that fills in the gap that takes its place. It’s a never-ending loop. An infinite loop. There are ways in which we can strategically push these thresholds. If we don’t, we are always going to come up against these thresholds because if you think about it, part of us tries to avoid fear and pain and rightfully so, at the same time, because life commands and demands growth. It will put things in our place over and over again, challenge, friction, pain, and problems so that we grow. Looking at what we can do to strategically position circumstances, experiences that will allow us to push those limits and thresholds, it could minimize or mitigate some of the challenges that often surprise us.

Early in my business career, I learned some invaluable lessons but it was at the cost of a lot of pain and failure I told you about. An investment failure that I had over ten years ago, but there were some relationship challenges that I had and they kept coming up over and over again. When I got out of the mess of 2008, 2009, 2010, I rebounded. I had a small team. I was doing pretty well, connected with the group and the group had another financial advisor that was working with them. I had a great relationship with this individual for a short period of time. Our wives are from the same country. We shared similar interests. We were very passionate about our principles, our values, and what we were doing financially.

We started working together and I saw some early signs. There were some red flags that came up regarding this individual’s desire to be independent beyond their own and not work with me in tandem. I did not feel the same way, but this individual did. I did not say anything. Red flags came up. I wanted to avoid conflict and build a relationship and it kept coming up over and over again. The final straw was this individual went to a group that we were working with and said, “I don’t think Patrick is necessary. I want to take over.” The group came to me and said, “This is what this person is saying. What do you think?” I was like, “I’m out.” It was too late. The relationship was ruined.

There were other circumstances after that with a team that I had built, at one point in 2014-ish, we had upwards of 70 employees. We were doing well and the wheels started to come off. There were people put in positions they shouldn’t have been in. There were those that had an illusion of experience and try to influence this area and that area. The conflict was a daily occurrence. I did not face that conflict. I did not know how to handle it. I kept pushing it off. What ended up happening is more of the same happened and ultimately, over the course of about twelve months, dozens of employees were either let go, fired or they’ve left on their own accord. It was insanely painful. I wanted to go back on my own. At the same time, I recognize the principle that life business was teaching me a lesson. I needed to learn that lesson.

What are the lessons you can gain from this? First off, again, nature is commanding growth in your life, your relationships, your finances, professionally, every area of your life. Physically, nature is compelling you to grow. Most people push off those signs. They don’t listen. They think that there’s an easier way, a shortcut and ultimately, what happens is a stronger experience then another strong experience. They keep stacking up until there’s a massive failure in pain. That’s when we decide to say, “This is a lesson. I need to make some changes. This is what I need to do.”

I’m going to go over two primary lessons you can take from this story. The first one is with regards to what I learned in any situation where another person is involved. I do not wait when a flag comes up. When a red flag occurs, I approach it head-on. Some of the things I say is I learned this from a therapist who specialized in businesspeople. I worked with her for over a year. She’s amazing. Karen Kindred, if you want to look her up, she has some podcast episodes and some interviews.

She taught me how to communicate with how I feel about certain things because you can’t argue with how somebody feels. It’s a way of feeling. I got to the point where these red flags came up. I said, “This is what is going on. This is how I feel. Please, help me understand your perspective.” That’s it. It’s very simple. You can use this in business and in your intimate relationships, your family relationships.

It helps you understand and share with and communicate with people at a deeper level. You either can gain perspective that you may not have had or their intention may be what you assumed and you know early on so you don’t have to prolong the inevitable, which will be even more painful if you continue to wait. I have an equation. When I feel something, see something that is irritating, that is frustrating, that borderline is like, “This is not right,” I approach it head-on. I share what I’m feeling. I share what my perspective is. In most circumstances, I’m not seeing things the same way as this other person. Them being able to express themselves helps resolve.

If the intention is what I assumed it was, I then escalate and say, “This is what I’m going to do next because this is how I feel. I don’t want it to go on any longer.” It points to a very quick conclusion that if a person does not want to essentially align with whatever the perspective and situation is, then there is a clear exit and it happens quickly. It’s so simple, but it’s been incredible. I’m going to give you the second lesson. I’m going to spend a little bit more time on this one, which is strategically designing a threshold by breaking through thresholds. Lesson two is you can strategically stretch yourself by pushing your own limits and learning to love challenges, friction, and conflict because you know that you can thrive because of being able to face it. Your psychological muscles continue to grow.

TWS 18 | Other Side Of Fear

Other Side Of Fear: Find something you can do once a year that pushes these physical and psychological thresholds and builds your muscles, which ultimately allow you to face whatever challenges.

 

I believe your income, your wealth, what you can manage, whether it’s people or money, are correlated with this ability to handle conflict, friction, and challenge. There are some invaluable lessons that you’ll receive in this. Self-respect and self-competence are scraping the surface. Plus, being able to strategically position yourself in these areas will also allow you to grow at a much quicker pace. A few years ago, I saw this crazy guy speak at a Tony Robbins business event. His name was Jesse Itzler and he has this thing called a Big Ass Calendar. He says in a nutshell, “To do at least one crazy physical thing every single year.” Jesse pushes this to the limit. I’m not going to talk much about it.

I mentioned on the show before, but he wrote a book called Living with a SEAL, which is when he invited a Navy SEAL that he had met to live with them for a couple of months because he was so impressed by this individual’s ability to live a lifestyle at this very heightened level from an accountability perspective. He also wrote a book called Living with the Monks, where he spent a good amount of time living in a Monastery in, I believe, Upstate New York, again, to experience a very simple, basic lifestyle.

Jesse has a myriad of programs that he advocates. He does this thing called Hell on the Hill. He has a house in Connecticut where they have this big hill and run up a hundred times. He has the event every single year. He also has this event called Everesting. It’s done at about a dozen places around the country where you essentially hike up and down typically ski resort hills, the equivalent of the elevation of Mount Everest. You hike up, take a gondola down or a chairlift down, hike up again, typically over 36 hours. It is significant as far as elevation ends up being 25 miles-ish.

He does these events because he has connected this idea of pushing your physical and also mental thresholds strategically. What it does, it’s not just the physical aspect, you learn what you’re capable of. You push yourself to those limits that help your body, mind, and you realize that it can do hard things. It transits and builds muscles. I’m going to come back to the Everesting. There are other events, too. I’ve mentioned the Tony Robbins events, which are very psychological in nature that push you to these thresholds. An old business colleague of mine, Garrett White, has a program called Wake Up Warrior, which is primarily designed for men but pushes you to these psychological as well as physical limitations. A guest that I’m going to have on soon, Tim Reynolds. He has a course called Reclaim your Gladiator, where he does something similar. Mostly physical in nature at his ranch in Texas.

If you keep pushing these challenges off, life is going to put them in your path regardless. Click To Tweet

There are so many different events like this, but the idea is to find something you can do once a year that pushes these physical and psychological thresholds and builds your muscles, which ultimately allow you to face whether they are challenges in marriage or friction in business. It allows you to face those and grow quickly from them instead of doing what I did, pushing them off. You attack it head-on because you understand the nature of the challenge, friction, and growth. The fact that if you keep pushing them off, life is going to put them in your path regardless. What I’m going to do soon, as you guys are reading to this episode, I am going to be going up this ski resort at Snowbasin. It’s in Eden, Utah, about an hour North of where I am in Salt Lake City. I’m going to be doing Everesting.

I’m going to be going up and down about 13, 14 times and I’m going to document it. I’m not going to document it to signal anything other than wanting to have you guys there as my accountability partner. I’m doing this by myself. There’s obviously a group doing it, but I’m not doing it with a friend, family member, a busy business colleague. I’m doing it by myself. I’m essentially going to be recording my thoughts, my experience, especially in those times of pain and difficulty. You are my audience and family and I want you to hold me accountable. I believe that these physical circumstances allow growth, not just in that specific category but in a lot of other aspects of life. I’ve done a couple of Tough Mudder and Spartan events. There are lots of these mud races, obstacle races, workout routines that allow you again to strategically position conflict, challenge, and friction in your life so that you are constantly growing.

Thank you for reading. I hope you learned something. Go out there, face some challenges, toe the line. You’ll be glad you did. Email me at Hello@TheWealthStandard.com. Tell me what you’re up to. Tell me what challenge you’re willing to face. Tell me what challenge you have faced in the past. I’d love to hear from you. If you want to adopt this Big Ass Calendar philosophy, psychology, go check out Jesse Itzler. He has a brand called Build Your Life Resume. Thanks for reading. We’ll talk to you next time. See you.

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